The best healthy cooking oils – Third choice

The best healthy cooking oils – Third choice

Choosing the right cooking oil is crucial for maintaining a healthy lifestyle. With so many options, deciding which one to use can be overwhelming. Different oils have different nutritional values and smoking points, which can significantly affect the flavour and quality of your food. This article will discuss Canada’s food guide‘s third-choice healthy cooking oils and their unique uses and benefits for overall health and well-being. These oils have been chosen based on their nutritional value, smoking point, and overall health benefits. By choosing the right cooking oil, you can add flavour and introduce essential nutrients to your meals, all while maintaining a healthy diet.

Those are the third choice of cooking oils recommended by Canada’s food guide.

Canola oil (Rapeseed Oil)

canola oil

High in Monounsaturated fats & a good source of Polyunsaturated
60-65% MUFA
30-35% PUFA
7-8% saturated
Smoke point:
204-232°C/400-450°F

Canola oil, also known as rapeseed oil, is a popular cooking oil known for its neutral taste, light texture and high smoke point, making it suitable for a wide range of cooking applications. Canola oil is extracted from the canola plant’s seeds, a rapeseed cultivar that has been bred to be low in erucic acid and glucosinolates, two compounds that can be harmful in high amounts. Canola oil is high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which are considered heart-healthy and have been shown to lower cholesterol levels. Although it contains a higher proportion of monounsaturated fat, canola oil is also a good source of polyunsaturated fat. It is also one of the few oils that contain an excellent plant-based source of omega-3 fats, a beneficial type of polyunsaturated fat. In addition, canola oil has the lowest level of saturated fat among cooking oils. It is a good source of vitamin E, which has antioxidant properties and may help protect against chronic diseases. However, canola oil is still processed and should be consumed in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

People often consider it unhealthy because they associate it with fried food. It isn’t actually all that bad for you on its own. Thanks to its fatty acid profile, this is one of the healthiest oils available. The omega-3s and omega-6s may help with cardiovascular health. In 2006, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decided that manufacturers could claim that 1 1/2 tablespoons of canola oil a day may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease when used instead of saturated fat. It might not pack as many benefits as your other oil selections. However, its versatility should still make it a staple. Canola oil is a versatile and practical cooking oil that’s not very expensive and can be used in a variety of ways, from baking and grilling to stir-frying and making salad dressings.

It has a high smoke point because it is chemically processed, but that doesn’t affect its health qualities.

What are the types of canola oil?

There are generally two types of canola oil available – refined and unrefined.
Refined canola oil undergoes a process of refining, which removes impurities, undesirable tastes, smells, or colours and gives it a higher smoke point, making it suitable for high-heat cooking methods. It tends to be highly processed, which means fewer nutrients overall.
Unrefined canola oil, or cold-pressed or virgin canola oil, is made without any chemical refining process and retains a more natural flavour and colour. Cold-pressed or unrefined oils contain more plant chemicals contributing to their healthfulness. It has a lower smoke point and is better suited for low-heat cooking or use in salad dressings and marinades. Cold-pressed or unprocessed canola oil is available but can be challenging to find.

Refined and unrefined oils have the same fatty acid profile.

What type of fatty acids are in canola oil?

The percentages of trans fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and smoke points can vary depending on the brand and type of canola oil. However, I can provide you with general information regarding these components:

Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs)

Canola oil is a good source of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly omega-6 fatty acids. PUFAs make up around 30% to 35% of canola oil. These fats are essential because our bodies cannot produce them, and we need to obtain them from dietary sources.

Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)

Canola oil is known for its high content of monounsaturated fatty acids, particularly omega-9 fatty acids. MUFAs make up around 60% to 65% of canola oil. These fats are considered heart-healthy and are associated with various health benefits, including improved heart health.

Saturated fatty acids

Canola oil is low in saturated fatty acids, which are the fatty acids that are solid at room temperature. Typically, canola oil contains around 7% to 8% saturated fat, making it a healthier choice than oils higher in saturated fats like coconut or palm oil.

Trans fatty acids

Canola oil is generally low in trans fatty acids. The trans fat content is typically less than 0.5%, which is considered low. Trans fatty acids are unsaturated fats that have been hydrogenated, and a high intake of trans fats has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease.

Smoke point

The smoke point of canola oil can vary depending on the refinement process and the quality of the oil. Typically, canola oil has a smoke point ranging from 204°C to 232°C/400°F to 450°F, making it suitable for a variety of cooking methods, including sautéing, frying, and baking.

It’s important to note that these values can vary depending on the specific brand and processing methods used for the canola oil.
It’s always recommended to check the nutrition label and manufacturer’s information for the most accurate and up-to-date values.

What is canola oil made from?

Made from canola seeds, a genetic variation of rapeseed, a flowering plant widely cultivated in Canada and responsible for its name, a derivative of “Canadian oil, low acid.” The “low acid” refers to versions of the rapeseed plant bred to have low erucic acid content.

What is canola oil best for?

Canola oil is popular due to its versatility, neutral flavour, and health benefits. Here are some ways canola oil is commonly used and considered best for:

Cooking at high temperatures

Canola oil has a high smoke point, making it suitable for high-heat cooking methods like sautéing, stir-frying, and deep frying. Its ability to withstand high temperatures without breaking down or releasing harmful compounds makes it a reliable choice for these types of cooking. Its neutral taste allows the flavours of the other ingredients to shine through without overpowering them.

Baking

Canola oil is often used as a substitute for butter or other oils in baking recipes. It helps create moist and tender baked goods while enhancing their shelf life. Cakes, muffins, cookies, and quick bread are examples of dishes where canola oil can be beneficial.

Grilling and Roasting

Canola oil can be used as a marinade or a coating for grilling or roasting meats, vegetables, or seafood. It helps to prevent sticking and adds a mild flavour to the grilled or roasted food.

Salad dressings and Marinades

Canola oil’s neutral flavour makes it a versatile base for homemade salad dressings and marinades. It can be combined with other ingredients, such as vinegar, citrus juice, herbs, and spices, to create flavorful dressings or marinades. Its light taste doesn’t overpower the other ingredients, allowing the flavours of herbs, spices, or other condiments to shine through. It has less flavour than other vegetable and seed oils, so you may not want to use it in recipes like salad dressings where you want the oil to add flavour.

Light and versatile cooking

Canola oil’s neutral taste and light texture make it suitable for a wide range of cooking methods. It can be used for light sautéing, grilling, roasting, or even as a drizzle over cooked vegetables or pasta dishes.

Oil for greasing pans

Canola oil can be used to grease baking pans, griddles, or pans before cooking or baking. It helps prevent sticking and allows for easy food release from the pan.

Everyday Cooking and Meal Preparation

Canola oil is a popular choice for everyday cooking due to its accessibility and affordability. Its versatility allows it to be used in various recipes, whether for breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

Other uses

Europe is putting a lot of stock into canola as a biofuel. You’ll find it in candles, lipsticks, and even newspaper ink. Again, “versatility” is the word.

It’s important to note that individual preferences, dietary needs, and cultural or regional cooking styles may influence the choice of cooking oil.
Canola oil is considered a healthier option due to its low saturated fat content and high levels of heart-healthy monounsaturated fats.
 However, it’s always recommended to maintain a balanced and varied diet and consider consulting with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian for personalized dietary advice.

What is canola oil not recommended for?

While canola oil is generally considered a healthy cooking oil, there are a few situations where it may not be recommended or suitable:

Salad dressings

Because it has a neutral taste that doesn’t do much for your food in the flavour department, it has less flavour than other vegetable and seed oils, so you may not want to use it in recipes like salad dressings where you want the oil to add flavour.

Allergies or sensitivities

Some individuals may have allergies or sensitivities to canola oil. Suppose you have a known allergy or sensitivity to canola oil. In that case, it’s important to avoid using it and seek alternative cooking oils that are safe for you.

High Omega-6 fatty acid intake

Canola oil contains a high amount of omega-6 fatty acids compared to omega-3 fatty acids. An excessive intake of omega-6 fatty acids without an adequate balance of omega-3s can lead to an imbalance. Maintaining a proper ratio of these essential fatty acids is important by incorporating other food sources rich in omega-3s or using alternative cooking oils with a more balanced fatty acid profile.

Refined and processed varieties

Some canola oils undergo extensive refining and processing methods, which may involve chemical solvents or high heat. These processes can strip away some of the natural nutrients and antioxidants present in the oil. Non-organic canola oil is also usually processed using a chemical solvent called hexane, but the trace amounts of hexane in the finished product do not threaten your health. Still, if you want to avoid it, choose organic (hexane is not allowed in organic production), cold-pressed, or expeller-pressed canola. Opting for cold-pressed or minimally processed canola oil may be a healthier choice.

Cooking beyond the smoke point

Canola oil has a high smoke point, but when heated beyond this point, it can start to break down, release smoke, and potentially produce harmful compounds. It’s important to monitor the temperature and avoid overheating the oil during cooking to prevent it from reaching its smoke point.

Individual dietary preferences

While canola oil is a commonly used cooking oil, individual dietary preferences and cultural practices may lead some individuals to choose alternative oils based on personal beliefs, taste preferences, or regional cooking traditions.

Overall, canola oil is considered a healthy choice for most individuals when consumed in moderation as part of a balanced diet.
As always, it’s important to consider individual dietary needs and consult a healthcare professional or registered dietitian for personalized advice.

How to store canola oil?

To store canola oil properly and maintain its quality, follow these guidelines:

Keep it in a cool, dark place

Store canola oil in a cool, dark area away from direct sunlight. Exposing the oil to light and heat can lead to oxidative damage and degradation of its quality. A pantry or cupboard is a suitable location for storage.

Ensure proper seal

Make sure the canola oil bottle is tightly sealed to prevent air from entering. Exposure to air can accelerate oxidation and spoil the oil. After each use, check the bottle cap or lid to keep it securely closed.

Avoid temperature fluctuations

Canola oil should be stored at a stable temperature. Avoid storing it near stoves, ovens, or other sources of heat. Frequent temperature changes can affect the oil’s stability and quality.

Use dark-coloured glass containers

Choose canola oil bottles made of dark-coloured glass. This helps to block out light and reduce the oil’s exposure to sunlight. If the oil comes in a transparent bottle, consider transferring it to a dark glass container to protect its quality.

Check for rancidity

Over time, canola oil can become rancid. Check the smell and taste of the oil before using it. Rancid oil may have an off smell or taste or appear cloudy. If you detect any signs of rancidity, it’s best to discard the oil and obtain a fresh bottle.

Following these storage guidelines can help maintain canola oil’s quality and shelf life.
Remember always to check the expiration date on the bottle and use it within the recommended timeframe for the best flavour and quality.

What are canola oil pros and cons?

Canola oil has both advantages and disadvantages. Here are the pros and cons of canola oil:

Pros of canola oil

Heart-healthy fats

Canola oil is low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fats, which are considered heart-healthy. Monounsaturated fats can help reduce bad cholesterol levels and decrease the risk of heart disease.

Omega-3 fatty acids

Canola oil contains a good amount of omega-3 fatty acids essential for overall health. Omega-3s have been linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, improved brain function, and reduced inflammation.

Versatile cooking oil

Canola oil has a neutral flavour and a high smoke point, making it suitable for various cooking methods such as sautéing, frying, baking, and grilling. Its versatility allows it to be used in a wide range of recipes.

Affordable and widely available

Canola oil is one of the most commonly available cooking oils. It is generally more affordable compared to other healthier alternatives.

Cons of canola oil

Omega-6 fatty acids

While canola oil contains beneficial omega-3 fatty acids, it is also relatively high in omega-6 fatty acids. An excessive intake of omega-6s without a proper balance of omega-3s can lead to an imbalance, which may have negative health effects.

Processing methods

Some canola oils undergo intensive processing, including refining and using chemicals. These processes can strip away some of the oil’s natural nutrients and antioxidants. Opting for less processed or cold-pressed canola oil may be a healthier choice.

Allergies or sensitivities

Canola oil may cause allergies or sensitivities in some individuals. Suppose you have a known allergy or sensitivity to canola oil. In that case, it should be avoided, and alternative cooking oils should be chosen.

Environmental concerns

Canola oil production involves growing genetically modified crops, which can raise environmental concerns for some individuals who prefer organic or non-GMO options.
Almost all canola grown in North America is genetically modified, so choose organic if you want to avoid GMOs.

It’s important to consider these pros and cons and make an informed decision based on your individual dietary needs, preferences, and health goals.
Consulting with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian can provide personalized guidance regarding the suitability of canola oil in your diet.

Corn oil (also known as maize oil)

corn oil

High in Polyunsaturated fats
24-30% MUFA
58-65% PUFA
13-14% saturated
Smoke point:
Refined 227-232°C/440-450°F

Corn oil is extracted from the germ of corn (maize) kernels. Corn oil is relatively heart-healthy because it is composed mainly of polyunsaturated fatty acids and is low in saturated fat. Corn oil has a mild taste and a high smoke point, making it suitable for various cooking methods, including frying, grilling, and baking. It has a nutty taste with a hint of corn as well. One can feel the taste of corn on the cob in the unrefined, cold-pressed oil. However, refined and processed oils lose their aroma and much of their taste. It is also used to produce margarine, mayonnaise, and salad dressings. In addition, corn oil is widely used in the food industry to enhance the texture and flavour of processed foods. It is important to note that corn oil is high in calories and should be consumed in moderation to avoid weight gain. Corn oil is another oil that is high in omega-6 fatty acids. While small amounts of omega-6 fats are necessary for the body, an excessive intake of omega-6 fatty acids can promote inflammation. It may increase the risk of chronic diseases.

What are the types of corn oil?

Corn oil is primarily produced from the germ of corn kernels. There are generally two types of corn oil available:

Refined Corn Oil

The common process of making corn oil involves expeller pressing. The oil is then treated with a solvent. After that, it is refined, eliminating free fatty acids. Refined corn oil is obtained through a process of refining, which involves the removal of impurities and the extraction of oil from corn germ. Finally, it is sent through steam distillation to eliminate volatile organic compounds. However, this process leads to a loss of useful compounds. Also, it leads to contamination with the solvent, although very small. This refining process produces a neutral flavour and a high smoke point, making it ideal for various cooking methods, including frying, sautéing, and baking. As it gets refined, it turns pale yellow.

Unrefined Corn Oil

Unrefined corn oil, or crude or virgin corn oil, is less processed than its refined counterpart. It undergoes minimal or no refining process, preserving more natural corn flavour, aroma, and colour. Corn oil is dark in colour when unrefined. Unrefined corn oil has a slightly lower smoke point and is commonly used in dressings, marinades, and light sautéing. The best oil in terms of health benefits is cold-pressed oil. Unrefined oil contains more health-boosting plant phytochemicals. A few producers make 100 % pure unrefined corn oil. This is more expensive than other corn oils but natural and organic.

Corn oil is generally not toxic if produced using the cold-pressed method.
If solvents were used to extract the oil, then it could lead to serious adverse health effects in the long run. 
It’s worth noting that some variations of corn oil may be labelled “organic” or “expeller-pressed”, indicating specific production methods or organic farming practices used in their creation.

What type of fatty acids are in corn oil?

The percentages of trans fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) in corn oil may vary slightly depending on the specific brand or variety of corn oil. However, here are the approximate ranges:

Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs)

Corn oil is known for its high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly omega-6 fatty acids. On average, corn oil consists of about 58-65% PUFAs. The specific omega-6 to omega-3 ratio may vary.

Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)

Corn oil typically contains approximately 24-30% monounsaturated fatty acids. MUFAs are heart-healthy fats and can help lower bad cholesterol levels when consumed instead of saturated fats or trans fats.

Saturated fatty acids

Corn oil generally contains around 13-14% saturated fatty acids. Saturated fats are generally recommended to be consumed in moderation due to their potential impact on heart health.

Trans fatty acids

Corn oil is one of the few vegetable oils that contain trans fats. However, 100 gm of corn oil contains just 0.3 gm of trans fats. Even though trans fats are bad for cardiovascular health, this amount is small. Corn oil typically has very low levels of trans fatty acids, usually less than 1% of total fat content. It is considered a relatively low source of trans fats compared to other oils or solid fats.

Smoke point

The smoke point of corn oil can vary depending on the processing and purity of the oil. Refined corn oil has a relatively high smoke point ranging from 227-232°C/440-450°F. This makes it suitable for various cooking methods, including frying, sautéing, and baking at high temperatures.

It’s important to note that while corn oil contains beneficial fatty acids, it is still recommended to consume it in moderation as part of a balanced diet.
It’s always a good idea to check the nutrition label on the specific brand of corn oil you are using for more precise information.

What is corn oil made from?

Corn oil is extracted from the germ (the small germinating part of the seed) of corn (maize) kernels.

What is corn oil best for?

Corn oil is commonly used in various culinary applications and has several qualities that make it suitable for specific uses. Here are some ways corn oil is best utilized:

Frying

Corn oil is particularly well-suited for frying due to its high smoke point. It can withstand high temperatures without breaking down or smoking. This makes it a popular choice for deep-frying or pan-frying foods like chicken, french fries, donuts, and other breaded or battered items.

Sautéing and Stir-Frying

With its mild flavour and versatility, corn oil is often used for sautéing and stir-frying. It can quickly cook vegetables, meats, and other ingredients over high heat. Its neutral taste allows the flavours of the other ingredients to come through.

Baking

Corn oil is frequently used in baking recipes as a substitute for butter or other oils. It helps create moist and tender baked goods while contributing to their texture. Cakes, cookies, muffins, and bread are examples of baked goods where corn oil can be used.

Salad dressings and marinades

Corn oil’s neutral flavour and light texture make it an excellent base for homemade salad dressings and marinades. It allows the flavours of herbs, spices, citrus, or other ingredients to shine without overpowering the dish.

Grilling and Roasting

Corn oil can be used for brushing or marinating meats, vegetables, or other ingredients before grilling or roasting. It helps prevent sticking and enhances browning while adding a subtle flavour to the food.

Popcorn

Corn oil is commonly used in popcorn-making machines or stovetop popcorn popping. Its high smoke point allows the corn kernels to pop efficiently, adding a mild flavour.

Other uses

Besides many other industrial applications, it is also used in skincare and hair care.

It’s crucial to use corn oil in moderation and consider individual preferences, dietary needs, and cultural cooking practices that may influence the choice of cooking oil.
It’s also recommended to monitor portion sizes and incorporate other healthier cooking oils and fats for overall dietary diversity.
While corn oil has its advantages, it’s still important to maintain a balanced and varied diet and consider consulting with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian for personalized dietary advice.

What is corn oil not recommended for?

While corn oil is a commonly used cooking oil, there are a few situations where it may not be recommended or suitable:

Allergies or sensitivities

Some individuals may have allergies or sensitivities to corn or corn products. Suppose you have a known allergy or sensitivity to corn. In that case, it’s important to avoid using corn oil and seek alternative cooking oils that are safe for you.

High Omega-6 fatty acid intake

Corn oil is relatively high in omega-6 fatty acids compared to omega-3 fatty acids. An excessive intake of omega-6s without an adequate balance of omega-3s can lead to an imbalance. Maintaining a proper ratio of these essential fatty acids is important by incorporating other food sources rich in omega-3s or using alternative cooking oils with a more balanced fatty acid profile.

Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)

A significant portion of commercial corn crops used to produce corn oil are genetically modified organisms (GMOs). If you prefer to avoid GMOs in your diet, you may opt for organic or non-GMO-certified corn oil.

Personal taste preferences

While corn oil is a widely used cooking oil, individual taste preferences may lead some individuals to choose alternative oils based on personal beliefs, taste preferences, or regional cooking traditions.

Limited nutritional value

While corn oil can contribute to calorie intake, it doesn’t offer significant amounts of essential nutrients or antioxidants compared to other oils. Suppose you are looking for oils with higher levels of nutrients or health-promoting compounds. In that case, you may consider alternatives such as oliveavocado, or flaxseed.

Other uses

  • Hair oil: Corn oil makes hair more manageable, although it is not recommended as hair oil.
  • Massage oil: It is an excellent emollient, though not as good as the well-known massage oils like olivecoconut or sweet almond. Corn oil can be used for massage oil, although it is not popular. It can carry essential oils and, as such, can be used in aromatherapy massages. It has a mild nutty flavour which should go well with the essential oils of nuts.
  • Moisturizer: It is a moisturizer for the skin. Corn oil is a gentle oil; you can use it as a base oil for household products like lip balms, salves, creams, and night oils.
  • Other common uses are Soap making, Carrier for medicines, As an ingredient in insecticides, Preventing corrosion on iron surfaces (rustproofing), Manufacture of nitroglycerin. It is also used in biodiesel technology.

Corn oil is generally considered safe for consumption.
It can be a part of a balanced diet when used in moderation.
However, individual dietary preferences and considerations, such as allergies, nutritional goals, or cultural practices, may influence the choice of cooking oil.
Suppose you have specific dietary concerns or questions.
Consulting with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian for personalized advice is recommended in that case.

How to store corn oil?

To store corn oil properly and maintain its quality, follow these guidelines:

Keep in a cool, dark place

Store corn oil in a cool, dark area away from direct sunlight. Exposure to light and heat can lead to oxidation and degradation of the oil. A pantry or cupboard is a suitable location for storage.

Ensure proper seal

Make sure the corn oil bottle is tightly sealed to prevent air from entering. Exposure to air can accelerate oxidation and spoil the oil. After each use, check the bottle cap or lid to keep it securely closed.

Avoid temperature fluctuations

Corn oil should be stored at a stable temperature. Avoid storing it near stoves, ovens, or other sources of heat. Frequent temperature changes can affect the oil’s stability and quality.

Use dark-coloured glass containers

If possible, choose corn oil bottles made of dark-coloured glass. This helps to block out light and reduce the oil’s exposure to sunlight. If the oil comes in a transparent bottle, consider transferring it to a dark glass container to protect its quality.

Check for rancidity

Over time, corn oil can become rancid. Check the smell and taste of the oil before using it. Rancid oil may have an off odour, taste or appear cloudy. If you detect any signs of rancidity, it’s best to discard the oil and obtain a fresh bottle.

Following these storage guidelines can help maintain corn oil’s quality and shelf life.
Remember always to check the expiration date on the bottle and use it within the recommended timeframe for the best flavour and quality.

What are corn oil pros and cons?

Corn oil has its advantages and disadvantages. Here are the pros and cons of corn oil:

Pros of canola oil

Versatile cooking oil

Corn oil has a high smoke point, which makes it suitable for various cooking methods such as frying, sautéing, stir-frying, and baking. It can withstand high temperatures without breaking down or smoking.

Mild flavour

Corn oil has a relatively mild flavour, allowing the natural flavours of the ingredients in a dish to shine through. It doesn’t overpower the taste of other foods, making it versatile for a wide range of recipes.

Source of Vitamin E

Corn oil is a natural source of vitamin E, a fat-soluble antioxidant. Vitamin E helps protect cells from oxidative damage, supporting overall health and well-being.

Good for the health of the cardiovascular system if taken within limits

Corn oil is good for the health of the cardiovascular system if taken within limits. The most studied property of corn oil is its ability to lower LDL blood cholesterol when taken within limits unless corn oil is taken in such high amounts that its saturated fat content increases cholesterol levels. Like olive oil, it reduces blood pressure post-consumption in hypertensive patients. However, as always, you should keep the consumption of fats within limits, no matter how healthy.

Affordable and widely available

Corn oil is typically more affordable than other cooking oils and is widely available in most grocery stores.

Cons of canola oil

High Omega-6 fatty acids

Corn oil is rich in omega-6 fatty acids, which are essential fatty acids. However, excessive consumption of omega-6s without a proper balance of omega-3s can lead to an imbalance, potentially promoting inflammation and certain health issues. Maintaining a balanced ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids in the diet is important.

Limited nutritional value

While corn oil contains small amounts of essential nutrients and vitamin E, it doesn’t provide significant amounts of other vitamins, minerals, or antioxidants compared to some other oils.

Environmental and sourcing concerns

The production of corn oil often relies on conventional corn crops, which can have environmental implications, including pesticide use and GMO cultivation. If environmental or GMO concerns are important to you, choosing organic or non-GMO-certified corn oil may be more suitable.

Potential for allergies or sensitivities

Corn allergies or sensitivities may occur in some individuals. Suppose you have known allergies or sensitivities to corn or corn products. In that case, avoiding or substituting corn oil with an alternative cooking oil is important.

Ultimately, the decision to use corn oil depends on individual dietary needs, preferences, and health goals.
Considering the pros and cons, it’s important to use corn oil in moderation and combine it with a balanced diet.
Consulting with healthcare professionals or registered dietitians can provide personalized guidance on suitable cooking oils.

Cooking oils to be avoided or limit the amount

According to Canada's food guide:

Not mentioned by Canada’s food guide:

Cooking fats to be avoided or limit the amount according to Canada's food guide
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This article is part of “Discover how to choose cooking oils wisely

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